Cloud Library

Cloud Library

雲書坊

A different experience of reading

For those who like to read e-books online, there is a "Cloud Library" customized for you. You can choose the e-book you want to read according to your preferences. Each e-book is attached with a table of contents. You can enjoy the same experience of reading a paper book while reading the e-book.

Buddhist discourses and commentary

Edited and Introduced By Bhikkhu Bodhi
Wisdom Publications

The Great Chronicle of Buddhas

The Great Chronicle of Buddhas

Author|Bhaddanta Vicittasārābhivaṁsa, Mingun Tipiṭakadhara Sayadaw

Translated from the Burmese by U Ko Lay and U Tin Lwin

The Great Chronicle of Buddhas-Singapore Edition

The Great Chronicle of Buddhas (Singapore Edition)

Author|Bhaddanta Vicittasārābhivaṁsa, Mingun Tipiṭakadhara Sayadaw

Translated from the Burmese by U Ko Lay and U Tin Lwin

Treasury of Truth Treasury of Truth

Treasury of Truth Illustrated Dhammapada

Author|Ven. Weragoda Sarada Maha Thero

In the Buddha’s Words – An Anthology of Discourses from the Pali Canon

In the Buddha's Words - An Anthology of Discourses from the Pali Canon

Edited and Introduced by Bhikkhu Bodhi
Wisdom Publications

Selections from The Connected Discourses of the Buddha

Selections from The Connected Discourses of the Buddha

Translated from the Pali by Bhikkhu Bodhi
Wisdom Publications

Selections from The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha

Selections from The Numerical Discourses of the Buddha

Translated from the Pali by Bhikkhu Bodhi
Wisdom Publications

Theragāthā: Verses of Senior Monks

Theragāthā: Verses of Senior Monks

Translated from the Pali by Bhikkhu Sujato and Jessica Walton
Sutta Central

Therīgāthā: Verses of the Senior Nuns

Therīgāthā: Verses of the Senior Nuns

Translated from the Pali by Bhikkhu Sujato and Jessica Walton
Sutta Central

A Biographical Sketch

Venerable Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo

Venerable “Luangpor” Pramote is a Buddhist monk residing in Suan Santidham Temple (The Garden of Peaceful Dhamma), Sriracha, Chonburi, Thailand. He teaches the Dhamma to avid practitioners looking to truly understand the middle way and to progress in their practice. Bangkok residents set out on an hour and a half drive in the darkness of the early morning to arrive before sunrise. They line up outside the temple to get a good seat to listen to his teachings, express their concerns regarding their own practice and receive individual advice – a custom that has been coined “submitting their homework” for the headmaster to fine-tune or modify.

He travels tirelessly around Thailand and abroad, teaching and helping to wake up the minds of people as he goes, in what is quickly becoming one of the biggest Buddhist enlightenment movements in recent times.

Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo became a monk in 2001 after being an avid meditator since he was seven years old. He has had many teachers along the way, but considers himself primarily a disciple of Luangpu Dune, from North Eastern Thailand’s Forest monk lineage of Luangpu Mun Bhuridatto.

A Meditators Guide

A Meditators Guide

Author|Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo
Translated from the Thai By Jess Peter Koffman

For You, the Newcomer

For You, the Newcomer

Author|Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo
Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo’s Teaching Media Fund

Ten Subjects of Discussion

Ten Subjects of Discussion

Author|Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo
Translated from the Thai by Hataitip Devakul

The Buddhist Way to Peace of Mind

The Buddhist Way to Peace of Mind

Author|Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo
Translated from the Thai by Jess Peter Koffman
Mr. Surapol Saipanich

The Noble Eightfold Path

The Noble Eightfold Path

Author|Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo
Translated from the Thai by Hataitip Devakul

To See the Truth

To See the Truth

Author|Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo
Translated from the Thai by Jess Peter Koffman

The Path to Enlightenment I

The Path to Enlightenment I

Author|Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo
Translated from the Thai by Hataitip Devakul

The Path to Enlightenment II

The Path to Enlightenment II

Author|Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo
Translated from the Thai by Hataitip Devakul

Waking Up America

Waking Up America

Author|Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo
Translated from the Thai by Jess Peter Koffman

Words of Wisdom

Words of Wisdom

Author|Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo
Compiled and translated by
Venerable Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo’s followers

Freedom From Suffering

Freedom From Suffering

Author|Luangpor Pramote Pamojjo
Translated from the Thai by Jess Peter Koffman

A Biographical Sketch

Phra Ajahn Mun Bhuridatta Thera

Phra Ajaan Mun Bhuridatta Thera was born in 1870 in Baan Kham Bong, a farming village in Ubon Ratchathani province, northeastern Thailand. Ordained as a Buddhist monk in 1893, he spent the remainder of his life wandering through Thailand, Burma, and Laos, dwelling for the most part in the forest, engaged in the practice of meditation. He attracted an enormous following of students and, together with his teacher, Phra Ajaan Sao Kantasilo, was responsible for the establishment of the forest ascetic tradition that has now spread throughout Thailand and to several countries abroad. He passed away in 1949 at Wat Suddhavasa, Sakon Nakhorn province.

Venerable Acariya Mun Bhuridatta Thera – A Spiritual Biography

Venerable Acariya Mun Bhuridatta Thera - A Spiritual Biography

Author|Venerable Acariya Maha Boowa Nanasampanno
Translated from the Thai by Bhikkhu Dick Sïlaratano

A Heart Released

A Heart Released

Author|Phra Ajahn Mun Bhuridatta Thera
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhānissaro Bhikkhu

Patipada – Venerable Acariya Mun’s Path of Practice

Patipada - Venerable Acariya Mun’s Path of Practice

Author|Venerable Acariya Maha Boowa Nanasampanno
Translated from the Thai by Venerable Acariya Pannavaddho

A Biographical Sketch

Phra Ajahn Dune Atulo

Ajahn Dune Atulo was born on October 4, 1888 in Praasaat Village in Muang District, Surin province. At the age of 22 he ordained in the provincial capital. Six years later, disillusioned with his life as an uneducated town monk, he left to study in Ubon Ratchathani, where he befriended Ajaan Singh Khantiyāgamo and reordained in the Dhammayut sect. Shortly thereafter, he and Ajaan Singh met Ajaan Mun Bhūridatto, who had just returned to the Northeast after many years of wandering. Impressed with Ajaan Mun’s teachings and with his deportment, both monks abandoned their studies and took up the wandering meditation life under his guidance. They were thus his first two disciples. After wandering for 19 years through the forests and mountains of Thailand and Cambodia, Ajaan Dune received an order from his ecclesiastical superiors to head a combined study and practice monastery in Surin. It was thus that he took over the abbotship of Wat Burapha, in the middle of the town, in 1934. There he remained until his death in 1983.

As one of the most senior members of the Forest tradition founded by Ajaan Mun, Ajaan Dune was widely known as Luang Pu, a term of great respect and affection, meaning “Venerable Grandfather.”

Gifts He Left Behind

Gifts He Left Behind

Author|Phra Ajahn Dune Atulo
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhānissaro Bhikkhu

A Biographical Sketch

Venerable Luangta Maha Bua Nanasampanno

Ven. Luangta Maha Boowa (12 August 1913 – 30 January 2011), a direct disciple of Ven. Ajahn Mun, was one of the most venerated teachers of twentieth-century Thailand. Considered the leader of the Thai Forest Tradition for many years, he was known for his fierce teaching style. Following the death of Ajahn Thate in 1994, he was considered to be the Ajahn Yai (or head monk) of the Thai Forest Tradition lineage until his death in 2011.

Amata Dhamma

Amata Dhamma

Author|Luangta
Maha Bua Nanasampanno
Translated from the Thai by Ajahn Suchard Sujato

Arahattamagga Arahattaphala – The Path to Arahatship

Arahattamagga Arahattaphala - The Path to Arahatship

Author|Luangta
Maha Bua Nanasampanno
Translated from the Thai by Bhikkhu Dick Sïlaratano

In Commemoration of the Venerable Ajahn Maha Bua Nanasampanno

In Commemoration of the Venerable Ajahn Maha Bua Nanasampanno

Author|Luangta
Maha Bua Nanasampanno
Translated from the Thai by Forest Monastery of Baan Taad

Death is Always Watching Us

Death is Always Watching Us

Author|Luangta
Maha Bua Nanasampanno
Translated from the Thai by Forest Monastery of Baan Taad

Forest Desanas

Forest Desanas

Author|Luangta
Maha Bua Nanasampanno
Translated from the Thai by Ajahn Suchart Abhijāto

Venerable Ajahn Khao Analayo

Venerable Ajahn Khao Analayo

Author|Luangta
Maha Bua Nanasampanno
Translated from the Thai by Ajahn Pannavaddho

A Life of inner Quality

A Life of Inner Quality

Author|Luangta
Maha Bua Nanasampanno
Translated from the Thai by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

The Dhamma Teaching of Acariya maha Boowa in London

The Dhamma Teaching of Acariya maha Boowa in London

Author|Luangta
Maha Bua Nanasampanno
Translated from the Thai by Ajahn Pannavaddho

Wisdom Develops Samadhi

WISDOM DEVELOPS SAMĀDHI

Author|Luangta
Maha Bua Nanasampanno
Translated from the Thai by Ajahn Pannavaddho

Samana

Samana

Author|Luangta
Maha Bua Nanasampanno
Translated from the Thai by Bhikkhu Dick Silaratano

Straight from the Heart

Straight from the Heart

Author|Luangta
Maha Bua Nanasampanno
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

Things As They Are

Things As They Are

Author|Luangta
Maha Bua Nanasampanno
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

A Biographical Sketch

Ajahn Chah Subhaddo

Ajahn Chah was born into a large, comfortable family in a rural village of northeast Thailand. In his early youth, he took samanera (novice monk) ordination and on reaching the age of twenty, he became a bhikkhu (a fully ordained Buddhist monk). In his early monastic life, Ajahn Chah studied Buddhist teachings and scriptures, but yearning for meditation guidance and dissatisfied with the slack standard of discipline at his monastery, he took on the life of a tudong or wandering monk. As a tudong monk, Ajahn Chah lived austerely in forests, caves and cremation grounds, and sought out the guidance of local meditation masters, including Ajahn Mun.

In 1954, after many years of practice without a permanent home, Ajahn Chah was invited to settle in a dense forest near his birth village. Over time, a large monastery called Wat Pah Pong was established there as monks, nuns, and laypeople came to hear Ajahn Chah’s teachings and train with him. His teachings and community contained elements commonly held throughout the Forest tradition, focusing on a simple, aesthetic, and rigorous lifestyle, discipline and moral conduct, meditation and contemplation, and a transformative inner experience rather than a reliance on scholarly knowledge. Although these Forest tradition elements were held in common, every Forest monastery and teacher also had their own flavor. In his teachings, Ajahn Chah placed an emphasis on community living and right view as essential aspects of the path to liberation.

Ajahn Chah was remarkable for his integrity, humor, and humanness; for his sense of surrender to spiritual practice and to the present moment; and for his ability to connect with people from many backgrounds in a spontaneous, straightforward, and joyous manner. He taught in a simple, yet profound style and emphasized practice in everyday life. As disciples gathered around Ajahn Chah, branch monasteries in his lineage also began to be established. Many new branch monasteries have continued to be established even after his death in 1992. At present there are more than three hundred Forest branch monasteries in Ajahn Chah’s lineage spread throughout Thailand and the world. Environmental conditions may cause the details of life amongst these many monasteries to vary somewhat; but in all of them, simplicity, heedfulness, and the strict adherence to monastic discipline support and encourage residents to live a pure life focused on the continuous cultivation of virtue, meditation, and wisdom.

Stillness Flowing

Stillness Flowing - The Life and Teachings of Ajahn Chah

Author|Ajahn Jayasaro
Panyaprateep Foundation

The Collected Teachings of Ajahn Chah

The Collected Teachings of Ajahn Chah

Author|Ajahn Chah
Wat Pah Nanachat

Bodhinyana

Bodhinyana

Author|Ajahn Chah
Wat Pah Nanachat

Everything is Teaching Us

Everything is Teaching Us

Author|Ajahn Chah
Wat Pah Nanachat

Food for the Heart

Food for the Heart

Author|Ajahn Chah
Wat Pah Nanachat

Living Dhamma

Living Dhamma

Author|Ajahn Chah
Wat Pah Nanachat

On Meditation

On Meditation

Author|Ajahn Chah
Wat Pah Nanachat

Taste of Freedom

Taste of Freedom

Author|Ajahn Chah
Wat Pah Nanachat

Clarity of Insight

Clarity Of Insight

Author|Ajahn Chah
Wat Pah Nanachat

Still Flowing Water

Still Flowing Water

Author|Ajahn Chah
Translated from the Thai by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

In Simple Terms

In Simple Terms

Author|Ajahn Chah
Translated from the Thai by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

It’s Like This

It’s Like This

Author|Ajahn Chah
Translated from the Thai by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

The Path to Peace

The Path to Peace

Author|Ajahn Chah
Wat Pah Nanachat

A Message from Thailand

A Message From Thailand

Author|Ajahn Chah
Wat Pah Nanachat

A Biographical Sketch

Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo

One of the foremost teachers in the Thai forest ascetic tradition founded by Phra Ajahn Sao Kantasilo and Phra Ajahn Mun Bhuridatto.

Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo (1907- 1961) was one of the foremost teachers in the Thai forest ascetic tradition of meditation founded at the turn of the century by Phra Ajahn Sao Kantasilo and Phra Ajahn Mun Bhuridatto. His life was short but eventful. Known for his skill as a teacher and his mastery of supernatural powers, he was the first to bring the ascetic tradition out of the forests of the Mekhong basin and into the mainstream of Thai society in central Thailand.

The Autobiography of Phra Ajahn Lee

The Autobiography of Phra Ajahn Lee

Author|Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

Food for Thought

Food for Thought

Author|Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

A Refuge in Awakening

A Refuge in Awakening

Author|Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

Frames of Reference

Frames of Reference

Author|Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

A Handbook for the Relief of Suffering

A Handbook for the Relief of Suffering

Author|Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

Inner Strength

Inner Strength

Author|Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

Keeping the Breath in Mind

Keeping the Breath in Mind

Author|Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
Translated from the Thai by
Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

Starting Out Small

Starting Out Small

Author|Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

Basic Themes

Basic Themes

Author|Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

The Craft of the Heart

The Craft of the Heart

Author|Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

The Divine Mantra

The Divine Mantra

Author|Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

The Heightened Mind

The Heightened Mind

Author|Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

The Path to Peace & Freedom for the Mind

The Path to Peace & Freedom for the Mind

Author|Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

The Skill of Release

The Skill of Release

Author|Phra Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo
Translated from the Thai by Ṭhanissaro Bhikkhu

A Biographical Sketch

Ajahn Buddhadasa Indapanno

Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu (Servant of the Buddha) went forth as a bhikkhu (Buddhist monk) in 1926, at the age of twenty. After a few years of study in Bangkok, which convinced him “purity is not to be found in the big city,” he was inspired to live intimately with nature in order to investigate Buddha-Dhamma in study and practice. Thus, he established Suan Mokkhabālārama (The Grove of the Power of Liberation) in 1932 near his hometown of Pum Riang (now in Chaiya District). At that time, it was the only forest Dhamma Center and one of the few places dedicated to vipassanā meditation in Southern Thailand. Word of Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu, his work, and Suan Mokkh spread over the years so that they are easily described as “one of the most influential events of Buddhist history in Siam.” Here, we can only mention some of the most interesting services he has rendered Buddhism.

Note: He used bhikkhu (originally “mendicant renunciate,” later settled “monk”) as part of his pen name, while ajahn is as a common form of address for monks and other teachers.

 
A Single Bowl of Sauce – Teachings Beyond Good & Evil

A Single Bowl of Sauce - Teachings Beyond Good & Evil

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Santikaro bhikkhu

Buddha-Dhamma For Inquiring Minds

Buddha-Dhamma For Inquiring Minds

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Ariyananda Bhikkhu

Concerning Birth

Concerning Birth

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Dhammavidū Bhikkhu

Dhamma for Sick People

Dhamma For Sick People

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Santikaro bhikkhu

Dhammic Socialism

Dhammic Socialism

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Donald K. Swearer

Fear

Fear

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Santikaro bhikkhu

Getting Started in Mindfulness With Breathing

Getting Started in Mindfulness With Breathing

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Santikaro bhikkhu

Happiness & Hunger

Happiness & Hunger

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Santikaro bhikkhu

Idappaccayata- The Buddhist Law of Nature

Idappaccayata- The Buddhist Law of Nature

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Dhammavidū Bhikkhu

Kamma in Buddhism

Kamma in Buddhism

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Santikaro bhikkhu

Living in the Present

Living in the Present

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Dhammavidū Bhikkhu

Looking Within

Looking Within

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Roderick S. Bucknell

Loving Others

Loving others

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Dhammavidū Bhikkhu

May We Leave This Legacy With You

May We Leave This Legacy With You

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Santikaro bhikkhu

Natural Cure for Spiritual Disease

Natural Cure for Spiritual Disease

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Santikaro bhikkhu

Nibbana for Everyone

Nibbana for Everyone

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Santikaro bhikkhu

Nibbana from Every Angle

Nibbana from Every Angle

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Dhammavidū Bhikkhu

No Religion

No Religion

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Puñño Bhikkhu

Paticcasamuppada- Practical Dependent Origination

Paticcasamuppada- Practical Dependent Origination

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Steve Schmidt

Quenching Without Remainder & The Fruit of Meditation

Quenching Without Remainder & The Fruit of Meditation

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Nāgasena Bhikkhu, Prieb Bunnag

The A, B, C of Buddhism

No Religion

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Transcriber|Stephen R. Schmidt

The First Ten Years of Suan Mokkh

The First Ten Years of Suan Mokkh

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Mongkol Dejnakarintra

The Liberating Teachings of Buddhadasa on Suchness

The Liberating Teachings of Buddhadasa on Suchness

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Jack Kornfield

The Meditative Development of Mindfulness of Breathing

The Meditative Development of Mindfulness of Breathing

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Stephen R. Schmidt

The Prison of Life

The Prison of Life

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Santikaro bhikkhu

The World of Metteyya Is at the Tip of Our Nose

The World of Metteyya Is at the Tip of Our Nose

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Dhammavidū Bhikkhu

Void Mind

Void Mind

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Dhammavidū Bhikkhu

Where Is Suan Mokkh?

Where Is Suan Mokkh?

Author|Buddhadāsa Bhikkhu
Translated from the Thai by Tanya Brockelman

莫輕於小善

莫輕於小善!謂『我不招報』,
須知滴水落,亦可滿水瓶,
智者完其善,少許少許積。
《法句經》第122偈

Think not lightly of good, saying, “It will not come to me.” Drop by drop is the water pot filled. Likewise, the wise man, gathering it little by little, fills himself with good. (Dhp122)